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The body dissipates heat 4 ways:

Conduction – heat transfer from one solid object to another. The transfer is always from the warmer object to the cooler object.

Radiation – the loss of heat in the form of infrared rays

Convection – heat transfer from the body to the surrounding air. Air temperature must be cooler than skin temperature in order for this to occur. Wind is a good example.

Evaporation – sweat from the skin results in heat loss by the body.*

If the body isn't accustomed to warm weather exercises, it takes approximately 10-14 days of exercise in those conditions in order to fully acclimate yourself.

Your body's "temperature regulation center," called the hypothalamus, adjusts during this period. Changes during this period include sweat rate increases, sweating begins earlier, better distribution of sweat over the whole body, sweat becomes hypotonic (less salty), and blood volume increases.

Read more: Tips for Exercising in Heat

Conduct a quick Google search, and you'll find miraculous claims about a tropical fat that has become increasingly popular among health-conscious consumers in recent years: coconut oil. Health claims about the oil's ability to help you burn fat, boost your memory, improve your heart health—and even prevent sunburn—abound. Many trusted talk-show hosts and ''wellness experts'' have touted coconut oil as nature's ''miracle'' food.

In contrast, many other health and nutrition experts disagree. Coconut oil has long been on the list of ''unhealthy'' fats due to its high saturated fat content.

So, whom should you believe?

Before you twist off the lid on a new jar, here are the real, unbiased—and research-supported—facts about coconut oil.

In a (Coco)nut Shell: The Condensed Story of Coconut Oil

Read more: The Truth about Coconut Oil

Runners are a breed all their own. I can say that because I am a runner. We can be quirky about our race rituals and to outsiders looking in, our lives seem to revolve around a "boring" sport of putting one foot in front of the other. But as any runner knows, it's not really that simple (or boring!), to try to fit in fartleks, quarters, repeats and speed work along with your hills, distance runs, and race days. Mile after mile, we pound the pavement—rain, cold or sun—to reach our goals.

No matter what type of runner you are, or how many races you have under your belt, we all share one common goal: to be better runners. We want to get faster, run farther, be more efficient, and stay injury-free. But if we hope to reach this goal, we must do more than just run. It is important to incorporate other exercises into our workout plans, as well as some rest, if we hope to reach our full running potential.

Read more: The Best Strength Training Exercises for Runners

Balanced breakfast? Check

Mid-morning snack? Check

Healthy lunch with your co-workers? Check

Passing up your friend's homemade cookies? Check

Coming home in the evening and going on a feeding frenzy? CHECK!!

Does this sound like the bulk of your days? You're in control, everything is going fine - until you come home starving at night and eat a large dinner, say yes to dessert (and seconds) and finish off a bag of chips before bed. What gives?

Read more: Is Evening Eating Destroying Your Weight Loss Efforts?

Everyone knows that athletes must plan and time their meals and snacks very carefully to reach their performance goals. But what about the rest of us? You try to squeeze in 30-60 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Do you have to be careful about what you eat before and after your workouts, too?

If you're eating a healthy diet and getting enough calories to support your activity level, you can probably rely on your own appetite, energy levels, and experience to tell you whether you need to eat anything before or after exercise and what it should be. The basic rule here is: Find out what works best for you, and do that.

There are some advantages to knowing how your body works and what it needs to perform at its best. The bottom line for healthy weight loss and fitness sounds simple: You have to eat fewer calories than you use up — but not fewer than your body needs to function at its best.

Read more: What to Eat After You Work Out

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