inb-logo8 ibg2 icon-appleicon-androidicon-facebookicon-twitter
Download the IBG App
Call us at (757) 229-5874

Balanced breakfast? Check

Mid-morning snack? Check

Healthy lunch with your co-workers? Check

Passing up your friend's homemade cookies? Check

Coming home in the evening and going on a feeding frenzy? CHECK!!

Does this sound like the bulk of your days? You're in control, everything is going fine - until you come home starving at night and eat a large dinner, say yes to dessert (and seconds) and finish off a bag of chips before bed. What gives?

Read more: Is Evening Eating Destroying Your Weight Loss Efforts?

Runners are a breed all their own. I can say that because I am a runner. We can be quirky about our race rituals and to outsiders looking in, our lives seem to revolve around a "boring" sport of putting one foot in front of the other. But as any runner knows, it's not really that simple (or boring!), to try to fit in fartleks, quarters, repeats and speed work along with your hills, distance runs, and race days. Mile after mile, we pound the pavement—rain, cold or sun—to reach our goals.

No matter what type of runner you are, or how many races you have under your belt, we all share one common goal: to be better runners. We want to get faster, run farther, be more efficient, and stay injury-free. But if we hope to reach this goal, we must do more than just run. It is important to incorporate other exercises into our workout plans, as well as some rest, if we hope to reach our full running potential.

Read more: The Best Strength Training Exercises for Runners

Remember when you were a kid and claimed that your dog ate your homework, when really you just didn't get around to writing your book report? Of course, your teacher knew you were fibbing. While most of us are past blaming the dog instead of taking responsibility for our actions, this doesn't mean that we're beyond using excuses—whether we realize it or not.

As a personal trainer and fitness instructor, I've heard almost every reason under the sun for why people "can't" be active, let alone do something specific like lifting weights for the recommended 20 to 30 minutes twice a week. However, outside of an actual health condition and a doctor's note saying that strength training isn't recommended, lifting weights is so beneficial to the majority of people that all excuses are busted pretty quickly.

Read more: 7 Strength Training Excuses: Busted!

Everyone knows that athletes must plan and time their meals and snacks very carefully to reach their performance goals. But what about the rest of us? You try to squeeze in 30-60 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Do you have to be careful about what you eat before and after your workouts, too?

If you're eating a healthy diet and getting enough calories to support your activity level, you can probably rely on your own appetite, energy levels, and experience to tell you whether you need to eat anything before or after exercise and what it should be. The basic rule here is: Find out what works best for you, and do that.

There are some advantages to knowing how your body works and what it needs to perform at its best. The bottom line for healthy weight loss and fitness sounds simple: You have to eat fewer calories than you use up — but not fewer than your body needs to function at its best.

Read more: What to Eat After You Work Out

Recently Lori, a client of mine, called me angry, upset and discouraged. She had just returned from her yearly physical, which she had been eagerly anticipating. Though she hadn't reached her weight-loss goal, Lori had made many lifestyle changes to promote good health. She had begun exercising on a regular basis, made some subtle shifts in her dietary habits that made her feel better, and had even begun a weekly yoga/meditation class to manage stress.

The results of the physical demonstrated her efforts had been paying off. Her blood pressure was in the normal level for the first time in years, her blood sugars had dropped, and her cholesterol profile had greatly improved. However, once the exam was complete and she was sitting with her physician in his office, rather than commenting on the improvements, he stated, "Lori, I was really hoping you would have dropped a lot more weight since our last visit. If you don't get serious about taking off the extra pounds, your risk of early disease will continue. Have you tried dieting?"

Read more: Can You Be Overweight and Healthy?

Our Latest Tweets

This user has reached the maximum allowable queries against Twitter's API for the hour.