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They go down easily and can be found anywhere and everywhere. Water, tea, milk, juice, soda, flavored waters, coffee, energy drinks, smoothies. This list touches just a few of the many categories of beverages but doesn't even delve into the different brands, sizes, flavors and varieties. Plus, with the billions of dollars spent to make drinks look, like, way cool, it's hard to resist them! You probably couldn't avoid them even if you tried; they are everywhere you turn, tempting you at gas stations, schools, doctor's offices, malls, movie theaters, airports, bus stops, street corners, your workplace—even at the gym! For time's sake, let's skip counting the dollars spent on marketing these drinks and go straight to the number that matters most if you're watching your weight: 400.

Read more: The Sneaky Calories You're Sipping On

Depression definitely can make it hard to find the motivation for exercise (among other things) because loss of interest in normal activities, along with the ability to enjoy them, is often one of the main symptoms of depression. But what does that mean in practical terms?

It definitely doesn't mean that you'll have to wait until your depression has cleared up before you'll be able to start building up a regular exercise routine. In fact, it probably means just the opposite. You might need to stop looking for your motivation or waiting for it to appear before you start working out. Instead, recognize that feeling unmotivated is part of the illness and that starting a regular exercise routine is an important part of the cure. It's a lot like getting out of bed in the morning on a low day—you might not feel like it; but you know that if you don't do it, things are only going to go downhill from there.

Read more: Finding Exercise Motivation When You're Depressed

For more than 40 years, people in the West have been running on built-up "squishy" shoes, hoping to prevent injury and go faster. Yet "barefoot" runners argue that running without shoes or in minimal footwear is safer and better.

Who's right? And what kind of shoes should you wear for the healthiest running experience? Find out in this thought-provoking article.

 

READ MORE...

Some days, I am just in a mood. I don't know what you call it, maybe stressed, bored, lonely, angry, sad, anxious, or tired. I call it "getting into a funk." When it happens, I have allowed my circumstances to dictate my attitude and my thinking and then—bam! Before I know what hit me, I'm in a full-blown funk. While I like to exercise when a bad mood rises, others turn to unhealthy habits like emotional eating or smoking. When you're upset, stressed or otherwise not feeling like yourself, exercise—and the mood-enhancing endorphins it produces—can be the best thing for you. Don't you believe me?

The next time you feel that mood coming on, identify what you're feeling and why. Are you bored because your best friend is out of town? Are you feeling lonely since the kids have left the nest? Or maybe you are stressing over finances. Whatever it is, pinpoint it. Then use the specific ideas below to bust your bad mood with a feel-good exercise prescription.

Read more: Bust Your Bad Mood with Exercise

Let's talk about fat-loss. More importantly, let's talk about why an effective fat-loss program utilizes strength training with weights. Over the last few years, more and more women have started buying into the benefits of strength training for physique and weight management. We are not restricting ourselves to just cardio machines, and now our workouts are more efficient (and hopefully a bit less boring) than ever. For many, the primary focus of hitting the gym is to burn fat, and we've outlined some (scientifically backed) reasons weight training is the best tool for just that.

1. More Muscle = Faster Metabolism

The first rule of fat loss: having muscle increases your resting metabolic rate (RMR)1,2. A crucial element of fat loss is simply having muscle mass; muscle mass burns fat for energy, and building muscle requires resistance training, not cardio. No matter what your trainer tells you, you won't build any lean muscle by performing 40 minutes on the elliptical. Lean muscle is built through a consistent resistance training program that utilizes large muscle groups and compound movements (like squats, rows, and push-ups).

2. Strength Training = Faster Metabolism

Read more: 5 Reasons Weightlifting is Critical for Fat Loss

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